Canada is no stranger to some pretty radical weather. From snow in September in provinces like Alberta to heat waves hitting Ontario when it's barely spring, you really never know what you're getting!

But, the latest weather spectacle to hit the country surely takes the cake for the most extreme. Why? Because it features a fire tornado, yes, you heard that right, but it's better known as  'firenado' for short. 

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The whole thing went down over in Vanderhoof, British Columbia near Chutanli Lake. There, a firefighter unit was attempting to tame a wildfire when it suddenly turned into a raging tornado of flames that lasted over 45 minutes. From there, it began to suck in their hose they had been using to attempt to tame the flames. The fighters on the job say the hose was taken over 100 ft into the air before melting due to the extreme heat.

 
 
 
 
 
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Clearly, in the footage, you can see fighters attempting to reel the hose back in, to no avail, due to the strength of the high winds. Towards the latter end of the video is when the winds become so strong that the massive flames begin to take the form of a tornado, creating the rare 'firenado'. 

B.C Wildlife information officers noted that the occurrence of a firenado has happened before- they're just extremely rare. The way they come about is a mix between high heat as well as rapid winds that grow larger and larger once it starts sucking in debris. 

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All of the firefighters in the video are luckily okay, and the one who filmed the video, Mary Schidlowsky, came out of the situation with some very insane footage of something that almost never happens! It definitely reminds Canadians that wildfires are insanely dangerous and you really never know what to expect with them. 

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