Several Ontario universities have come together to fight back against out of control street parties brought on by their schools' football season. Ontario University Athletics recently overhauled the fall schedule of the football season at several universities to reduce what was initially six weeks of spread games into two weekends, in the hopes of curbing the magnitude of unsanctioned parties.

Representatives from numerous universities arrived in Waterloo this past week for a meeting at Wilfried Laurier in the hopes of coming up with a viable solution to the problem. “It’s a little bit like a Rubik’s cube in trying to get everything solved,” explained Gord Grace the CEO of Ontario University Athletics according to Global News. “We’ve been able to come up with two primary homecoming dates for those six schools, and we’ve got that in place for the upcoming season, the 2019 season.”

Grace went on to explained that the drastic schedule changes were made to help efforts and inflict a positive change on the situation. However, homecoming parties are not the only issue to be tackled several other large-scale events, most notably St. Patrick’s Day, also posed a problem for the universities, as Global News points out.

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Despite the sheer scale of the street parties, those working at the universities remain optimistic that they will be able to put a sizable dent in the wild parties. It is uncertain at this time what plans the schools will be making to tackle other big party days.

The schools that are scheduled to be affected by these changes are the University of Waterloo, University of Guelph, University of Ottawa, Carleton University, McMaster University, Western University, Brock University, and the previously mentioned Queen's University. 

@westernuniversityembedded via  

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“We’re hopeful It’s not going to fix the problem, but I think it’s actually going to minimize the number of occasions on which there can be parties on multiple weekends with a lot of out-of-towners,” explained Daniel Woolf who serves as the principal of Queen University one of the schools associated with the initiative.

 

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