Over the past few years, there have been countless cases of cars speeding past school buses that are stopped and letting off passengers. Due to this, the Ontario government has announced that they are going to implement new strategies to limit the number of accidents that occur around school buses each year. Today, the government has announced that they are going to be installing cameras on the stop signs of school buses to crack down on reckless drivers. 

As we all know, it's illegal to drive past a school bus while the stop sign is out and passengers are leaving the bus. However, this law often isn't followed. Today, Transportation Minister Jeff Yurek made an announcement that these new measures will be implemented to ensure the safety of students and members of the community. 

According to City News, cameras will be placed on the stop signs of school buses to ensure that they are able to capture a photo of any vehicle that illegally passes a school bus while its stop sign is out. 

On top of this, the government has also announced that they are going to introduce new legislation that will help to increase the number of fines that are given to those who don't stop for school buses. 

This is part of a plan that has been created to help modernize the school system.  According to Yurek, statistics show that students are most likely to be injured while getting on or off a school bus or crossing the road. 

This change comes after an Ontarian man, Pierre Ranger has been calling for better security measures after his five-year-old brother was killed after he got off a school bus almost two decades ago. 

According to CHCH the vehicle that hit the boy and killed him instantly, did not stop for the flashing stop sign as the school bus was unloading passengers. Since then, Ranger has been in a constant battle to put cameras on school buses to prevent this from happening in the future. 

Last year, in Hamilton alone, police charged five drivers for driving past school buses who were unloading passengers.

At the moment, those who break these rules could face the loss of six demerit points and fines of up to $2,000. 

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