It's no secret that commuting in Toronto traffic can be tough. But when you've been stuck in a jam have you ever wondered exactly how much time is lost? Well, TomTom revealed that Torontonians actually spent almost six days stuck in traffic back in 2019, which amounts to about 71 basketball games.  

If you're a Raptors fan, you might have had some time to catch some extra games if you hadn't been stuck in the evening rush. 

TomTom Traffic Index for 2019 rated Toronto as the second-worst city in Canada in terms of how long the average commuter spent stuck in congestion.  

Following behind Vancouver, Torontonians spent five days and 22 hours in rush traffic throughout the year.

That's 71 basketball matches, or 126 Game of Thrones episodes if you aren't into sports. 

The release also states that you could have knitted 36 hats and six sweaters in the time you spent in a jam last year. 

This means that an average commuter spent so much time driving last year, that if they could get all their lost time back, they could start a new hobby.

To narrow the data down a little, those from the 6ix spent around 17-20 extra minutes daily per 30-minute trip during rush periods. 

While it may look bad, we didn't come close to topping the worst in the world. Toronto was only the 80th most congested city in the world, so it could be worse. 

The evening rush is also more intense than the morning rush, so you might even need a second coffee to get you through the ride home. 

While many view highways as being the most traffic-heavy, the study reveals that non-highway roads also tended to be a little bit more congested than highways.

Highways were 31% congested, while non-highways were 34% overcrowded.

Toronto was also rated as the worst commute in North America last year.

On top of that, commuters within the 6ix are also expected to have some of the longest commuter times throughout Canada.

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