When it comes to making and saving money, it can sometimes feel like you'll never have enough. You look around you and wonder how much other people are making, and more importantly, what are they doing right to make so much money? While it can take time to get raises, make bonuses, and find the job that pays you adequately for your skill, there are some things that you can actually do right now to make yourself richer.

Just little adjustments you can make to your bank institutions and banking accounts can have a huge effect on your savings and how much you're spending. The best part is that these little adjustments will save you more money in less time than it would if you were to work for it. So here they are: 5 things rich people do with their bank accounts.

Via Rawpixel | Unsplash.com

1. Shop around for the best deals

How did you pick your bank? To be honest, most people just pick a bank because it was the one their parents used. While it might be a good option for them, you should always look into the bank has the best rates and plans that fit you and your lifestyle.

You should care if your ATM fees get reimbursed, you should care if there's a monthly service charge, you should care about how much you want earn on your savings account.

Make the time to visit different bank institution to see what they're offering, or you can use websites that compare different bank rates like ratehub.ca and comparemyrates.ca.


2. Put your money with an institution that you respect and respects you back

Your time is important - don't bank with an institution that wastes it. Some banks are notorious for making you wait for aeons over the phone only to have a crappy customer service rep snap at you. Some important things you should consider are: how is their customer service, is their online banking user-friendly, are their apps easy to use, and are they hitting you with unexpected fees?

If you're more of an online banker and hate physically going into banks, you can try trusted online banks such as Tangerine and PC Financial. Tangerine is currently a subsidiary owned by Scotiabank, and PC Financial is owned by CIBC, so you know your money's safe with them.


3. Nickname your accounts

You might not know this, but most banks actually allow you to change the name of your banking accounts. Instead of calling it "Account #0375" you can actually get it renamed to something like "Bills", "The Hustla Fund", or whatever else the account is meant for.

As much as it sounds silly, it can actually work! Nicknaming your account can act as a mental roadblock for those times when you want to take money out to splurge on a YOLO experience you'll most likely regret later.


4. Call to get fees waived

We all inevitably get hit with bank fees, whether it's $2, $20, or $200. I personally once found an unexpected $5 fee tacked on to my chequing account. While it was a small fee, I didn't know what it was for and didn't want to pay $5 out of nowhere. I went to my banking institution and they explained that I had made more money transfers during that month than my allotted limit. This was something that I was unaware of. So I explained that I didn't know of this policy, and they waived the fee for me because of that.

While you may not always get certain fees waived, it's always worth a try. The worst they can say is no. But we should also mention that this only works if you are a customer in good standing, and only makes the occasional mistake.


5. Set up account alerts

As much as we have those moments where we don't want to look at our bank accounts, it's important to stay on top of them and setting up alerts for your accounts is a smart move.

Some banking apps allow you to set up alerts every time a cheque is cleared, a deposit arrives or when a transfer is made. If your banking app doesn't have these options, you can create alerts for yourself to check our bank account regularly. You can also download money managing apps like Mint that help you set up alerts for your personal budgets, bank accounts and credit card bills.

This will help you keep you in your budget, protect yourself from overdraft fees, and alert you to any fraudulent activity.

Source: The Financial Diet

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