Last year, Air Canada caused quite a stir when one of their planes landing at San Fransisco's airport was only meters away from smashing into another plane on the ground that was also filled with passengers. 

READ ALSO: An Air Canada Pilot Just Shut Down Japan's Biggest Airport And It's So Embarrassing

The near-miss accident has now been investigated by a US flight safety board and they found that the two Air Canada pilots manning the flight are completely at fault for narrowly avoiding a devastatingly fatal accident. 

According to the report, the plane accidentally came into land on a taxiway where four planes were waiting, instead of the runway, flying mere meters above another plane, and just barely avoiding disaster.

Fortunately, the pilots managed to pull the plane up just in time and avoid a collision, but if they had landed on the taxiway, they would have crashed into four planes, all full of passengers. One of the consulting pilots on the investigation told Global this would have been "the worst aviation disaster in history."

@aircanadaembedded via  

The investigation found that the Air Canada pilots ignored warnings about a runway being closed, mentioned pilot fatigue as another issue, and cited other mistakes that the pilots had made. 

READ ALSO: This Canadian YouTube Star Just Went Off On An Air Canada Employee For Harassment

The report did recommend that airports should have a better lighting and signalling system to clarify when runways are closed, and also that Canada should have stricter rules to avoid fatigue, but concluded that the two pilots were still at fault. 

@aircanadaembedded via  

The investigation didn't name either of the pilots involved but does confirm they are both experienced pilots. The captain at the time has over 20,000 flying hours, while the co-pilot has over 10,000 flying hours. 

Air Canada has not commented on the incident or said if there will be any actions taken against the two pilots at fault. 

Source: CBC

Comments are now closed.
Account Settings
Notifications
Favourites
Share Feedback
Log Out

Register this device to receive push notifications