The bald eagle is one of the most beautiful and majestic birds out there. It also happens to be a protected species in many different regions, including the province of Alberta. Unfortunately, some people don't respect that designation. Two Alberta bald eagles were found shot in two different locations, and authorities want to know who did it.

Alberta Fish and Wildlife posted about the two separate incidents on their Facebook page and asked for the public's help in catching the poachers who shot the protected birds.

The first incident is believed to have taken place on October 20. A mature bald eagle was found shot in a pheasant release site and reported to Alberta Fish and Wildlife. 

The second incident is believed to have occurred between October 26 and October 29. A juvenile bald eagle, which had previously been spotted feeding in the area, was found shot and killed near Tower Road in Fort McMurray.

According to the post, Alberta Fish and Wildlife do not believe the two incidents are connected in any way.

The bald eagle is a protected species in Alberta, just like all other birds of prey. There are no exceptions for hunting these birds. The maximum fine for killing a bald eagle in the province can reach up to $100,000. Any poachers who shoot a bald eagle can also get up to two years in prison.

Anyone with information that they can provide to Alberta Fish and Wildlife can do so through the Report A Poacher page on the Government of Alberta's website. 

There are a number of threatened species in Canada that require protection from hunting and other manmade hazards. Recently, a North Atlantic right whale was found to have died after getting tangled in fishing gear.

Still, Canada puts a lot of effort into protecting its threatened species, even if it falls short on other environmental factors. Canada is even home to more polar bears (a threatened species) than anywhere else in the world.


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