The famous Calgary Stampede has taken on a sombre note this week as three horses have died during the popular derby events. Earlier Friday the Calgary Stampede confirmed that a third horse death has been recorded during a chuckwagon race after a wagon collision on Thursday. Since this news, Canadians have taken to Twitter to express their concerns over the event and to demand that the Calgary Stampede be put to an end. 

In a press release, the Calgary Stampede stated that driver Chad Harden obstructed the path of the wagon of another driver, which then caused a third wagon to collide with the inner rail of the track. This collision resulted in the death of one of the racing horses which belonged to driver Evan Salmond. 

Since then, driver Chad Harden has been disqualified from racing for the rest of the 2019 stampede and in the future. He has also been fined $10,000. However, with this incident following two prior horse deaths, Canadians don't seem to be very happy with this outcome. 

On Wednesday, another horse was put down after it suffered a broken leg during one of the wagon races. While a third horse died after suffering a serious internal medical issue that the Stampede claims is not racing related. 

The Calgary Stampede states it has a zero-tolerance policy when it comes to preventable accidents and injuries and that the care and safety of these animals that participate in these events are the highest priority. 

They state that the death of two horses in the past week has been a tragic event, but ensure competitors that the stampede ensures the best and safest conditions possible for these horses. 

However, these promises don't seem to be enough for Canadians in the wake of these three deaths. Many Canadians are stating that this practice of racing horses for shows should have ended a while ago. Some Canadians are even comparing the sport to dogfighting and bullfighting. 

While many Canadians are pointing out this sport has led to many unwanted deaths and the mistreatment of animals. Many others seem to disagree and often view the stampede as a tradition that continues to be upheld to this day. 

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