Alberta has been especially freezing this month during a cold snap that dropped temperatures into the -40 C region in some areas. But if you are thinking about going somewhere tropical to warm yourself up, you may want to do a little research first. According to officials, the Alberta chinook is making the province warmer than Florida right now. 

Alberta has been absolutely frigid this winter season. From being the coldest place on earth to having highs of -20 C, we have seen it all. 

Even though we would all like to hop on a plane and go to warmer areas, The Weather Network has stated that Alberta is warmer than parts of Florida right now. 

According to The Weather Network, the chilly weather all came down to wind and we're being blessed with some especially warm winds right now. 

“Arctic high pressure has finally retreated and now moist, Pacific air is streaming over the Rockies,” the explained.

“That sets the stage for downsloping Chinook winds -- synonymous with strong gusts and rapidly climbing temperatures, especially for southwestern Alberta.”

Apparently, these west winds will give early morning temperatures in Alberta a break on January 22. 

Spots like Lethbridge will warm up to 1 C. Albertans are thanking their lucky stars for chinooks right now.

According to AccuWeather, chinook winds are strong winds that often occur during a storm. They are common in Alberta and the winds often pick up speed when going from high elevations of the Rockies to the plains. 

AccuWeather explains that winds of up to 80 km/h may reach speeds of up to 160 km/h by the time the air reaches the foothills and high plains. 

The Weather Network shows that Florida won't be experiencing the same chinook fate as Alberta this week. 

In fact, Mother Nature flooding the peninsula with cold and dry air. Apparently, this type of air only makes it to the state once or twice a year. 

Officials with The Weather Network say that this “wintry blast” is so strong that wind chill advisories stretch as far south as Miami.

By the morning of January 22, temperatures will feel close to freezing. 

Once you get farther north, some spots will actually be colder than southern Alberta. 

Even though it is obviously cold in the typically sunny state, these temperatures are not record-breaking. 

The Weather Network has stated that in 1985, there was a mid-January “Super Arctic Outbreak” that had some areas as cold as -14 C. 

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