Fraternities at the University of British Columbia have been a source of controversy in recent months. After six reported druggings at frat parties in September, UBC Professor Dr. Marina Adshade claimed that one of her students had allegedly been among the victims who were drugged. After taking a public anti-frat stance on social media, the UBC professor's anti-frat tweet on Remembrance Day has reopened the conversation.

At just before 11:30 a.m. on November 11, Dr. Marina Adshade shared a tweet that read: "@ubcprez wondering why frat boys are laying wreaths at the Remembrance Day Ceremony at UBC. Surely there are other more representative groups on campus to play this role?"

The tweet has since received a great deal of backlash on both Twitter and Reddit. "You are so filled of hatred towards young men, you had to tweet this DURING the actual ceremony," one Twitter user responded. 

"3 of my 4 grandparents served for Canada in WW2 but because I’m in a fraternity I am not a fair 'representative' of the spirit of Remembrance Day? Trying to isolate who is most worthy of paying their respects is bigotry, the focus should be on remembrance and respect in general," wrote another user, who claims to be a UBC student and fraternity member.

Last month, Dr. Marina Adshade spoke out about the alleged druggings taking place at UBC frat parties.

“One of my students spent the weekend in the hospital after being drugged in a Vancouver bar on Friday night. On Saturday morning there were six (6!!) women with her who had been drugged in the fraternities on UBC campus. And people ask me why I am opposed to the frat houses?” she tweeted on October 1.

Her tweet inspired others to share similar accounts. "First year at UBC I was drugged at a frat party," one Twitter user wrote. "I was okay and my friends took me to a safe place, but I distinctly remember being followed around by drunk frat boys looking to get some. My bad drinking from the punch bowl."

Another user commented that "fraternities should be banned in Canada. We don't need American traditions like that here."

After over a month of investigation, the RCMP concluded that they did not have enough evidence to confirm the druggings. 

In response, Dr. Adshade wrote on Twitter, "How remarkable that the RCMP on UBC campus went from: Possible victims were identified but none of them would speak to us. To: We are confident there are no victims. In one easy step. I wish I lived in this magical world."

Dr. Adshade's online remarks have received polarized responses, ranging from support to criticism. Though, it seems that reactions to her Remembrance Day tweet have been overwhelmingly negative so far.

Narcity has reached out to Dr. Marina Adshade for comment and we will update this story when we receive a response.


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