As daily case counts seem to be tapering off, there's a light at the end of the tunnel for B.C. Anyone keeping up with the province's daily updates has just one question on their mind: when will COVID-19 end in B.C.? According to provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry's latest reports, they're likely to see zero new cases by June 2020.

In her daily update on Monday, May 4, Henry revealed some relieving information: by mid-June of 2020, the province is likely to see no new daily cases if they keep on track with distancing and regulations.

This means keeping social interactions within 35 to 40% of normal. By "social interactions," she means talking face-to-face from a safe distance, but no touching or hugging.

And even if we raise these interactions to 60% of normal, we could still keep cases in control. This could mean opening retailers and restaurants with very strict rules and regulations in place.

"We have been able to put the brakes on COVID-19, but we haven't stopped the car. It also highlights that we must maintain safe physical distancing to keep our curve flat," said Henry and Health Minister Adrian Dix in a joint statement.

Henry warned that this is no time to slouch, however. If we aren't careful, we could see cases start to skyrocket again if we start seeing all of our friends all at once. It could be even worse than it was before, she said.

And while she did reveal that more relaxed rules are part of the new phase in lifting restrictions, seen in other provinces like Alberta, she didn't specify when this might start happening.

The province has been hinting that they'll give us a more clear better timeline by Wednesday, May 6.

Despite all the hard work that B.C. has put in to flatten the curve, we aren't getting as much attention for it as we ought to. 

 

Ford even said that Ontario should be more like Alberta when it comes to public health controls for COVID-19. Alberta has just under 6000 cases while B.C. has just over 2000.

That being said, Henry admitted that B.C. really did a great job when it came to flattening the curve, saying that their social distancing caused a "dramatic and sustained decrease" in new cases.

"We have deflected our curve, we are coming down nicely, we have the measures in place that we know are working," she said.

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