While snow globes are often used as a souvenir to remember your time abroad, Australia border agents discovered that they are also being used in attempts to smuggle drugs across the border. Australian police confirm that they discovered around $1 million worth of methamphetamine hidden in snow globes that were delivered from Canada this month. Anyone with information on this illegal cargo is asked to contact Australia's border watch. 

According to police, fifteen snowglobes were shipped from Canada to Australia by air when they were targeted for further examination by border agents. National Post states that the snowglobes featured llamas, South American animals, and cactuses, which may have originally sparked the border agents curiosity. 

The fifteen snowglobes were X-rayed before the liquid within the snow globes was tested. Police quickly discovered that the liquid within the snow gloves contained more than $1 million worth of methamphetamine, a popular street drug. 

So far, no charges have been laid for these snow globes and police are still investigating. Police have not stated exactly where in Canada this shipment of snowglobes originally came from. 

Australian police state that "our officers work tirelessly to prevent these harmful drugs from making it into Australian communities. Our officers can prove time and time again, that criminals who attempt to hide these substances in new and imaginative ways are wasting their time. " 

However, this isn't the only drug case that Australian police have had to deal with when it comes to our fellow Canadians. 

According to the National Post, there has been a strong Canadian presence in the drug world in Australia for the past few years. Canada is actually the third most frequent country of origin for cocaine seized at the Australian borders. 

Earlier this month, a Canadian woman was charged with smuggling cocaine into Australia. According to CBC, the woman hid twelve kilograms of the drug in the lining of her luggage. 

As she was traveling with her son, the 42-year-old woman was stopped for a targeted examination when border officials noticed the substance in her suitcase. 

According to CBC between 2016 and 2017, fifty kilograms of cocaine was detected from air cargo that was entering Australia from Canada. 

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