Climbing a mountain is never an easy task and there's always a risk of danger. One 16-year-old boy learned that firsthand. A Canadian teen climber miraculously survived a 150-metre fall down a mountain in Oregon with only a broken leg.

The 16-year-old Canadian was climbing Mount Hood in Oregon, a potentially active stratovolcano and the highest mountain in the state, on December 30 when he fell about 100 metres from the summit. 

Even though he's only a teenager, Gurbaz Singh, from Surrey, B.C., is an experienced climber. 

The trek up Mount Hood was his 98th climb.

The mountain's elevation is 3,429 metres but the summit is about 2,349 metres tall. With such high elevations, the teen could've fallen a much bigger distance.

He fell from the part of the mountain known as "Pearly Gates" down to the section known as "Devil's Kitchen."

After falling more than 150 metres, Singh came away with just a broken, leg and he credits not being more injured to his training and wearing a helmet. 

"We looked at my helmet afterwards and it was just destroyed. I'm so lucky," Singh told CTV News

People were able to reach him pretty quickly but the entire rescue took eight hours and for some of that time, Singh was actually hanging upside down. 

"I was trying to use all of the things that I had learned [to stop], but I lost my ice axe and I wasn’t able to stop my tumble, because as you tumble you gain more momentum," Singh said.

Other climbers on Mount Hood actually saw Singh fall. 

One person who witnessed the accident said "it was horrible" to see.

After rescuers located him, they managed to splint Singh's leg and bring him slowly back down the mountain hours after he had initially fallen. 

The county sheriff tweeted that the rescue took so long because of the elevation and the location.

After hearing about the harrowing ordeal, people were quick to point out how lucky Singh is.

"I'm still processing everything," Singh said. "I'm taking it one day at a time, trying to get back up on my feet."

According to the CBC, he underwent surgery on December 31 in a Portland hospital.

Because of the broken leg, he's on crutches, but is still able to get around and will be easing himself back into climbing after his recovery is done.


There are stories everywhere. If you spot a newsworthy event in your city, send us a message, photo, or video @NarcityCanada on Twitter and Instagram.


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