Spring is on the way and that means warmer temperatures and later sunsets but there's a trade-off happening this weekend. Daylight saving time will cost you an hour of sleep but it doesn't have to tire you out too much. There are so many things you can do to adjust to the time change.

On March 8, daylight saving time starts and we spring forward. So when it's supposed to be 2:00 a.m., the clocks will actually turn to 3:00 a.m. instead.

That means there will be more sunlight in the evenings which is probably a welcome benefit for most people but it also means there will be one less hour of sleep on March 8.

Losing that time can actually have an impact on you like tiring you out or making you groggy.

"A general rule of thumb is for every hour of time change that you experience it takes about a day for our bodies to adjust," said Heather Young, sleep consultant with Good Night Sleep Waterloo, to The Weather Network

However, that adjustment period doesn't have to be terrible.

To make the time change a little bit easier there are a lot of things you can try out.

"Blackout blinds, eye masks, earplugs or sound machines are all things we can add into our sleep routine in order to help us fall asleep easier and achieve higher quality sleep," Young said.

Also, you can cut back on having caffeine and alcohol close to the time when you go to sleep.

You should set down your devices and stop using them within an hour of the time you get into bed. 

Too much light in your bedroom at night and sounds that can disturb your sleep can also make it harder to adjust to the time change.

According to the Sleep Foundation, sleeping in for an extra half an hour when we spring forward on March 8 can help your brain and body adjust more quickly.

Since the sunrise will also be an hour later, you could help yourself wake up and be alert by letting the sunlight in during the morning.

While people get ready for the time change, some Canadians will be completely unaffected by daylight saving time.

Along with most of Saskatchewan, some parts of Quebec, Ontario, and B.C., and Nunavut's Southampton Island are on standard time all year long.

So their clocks don't change at all.

This year's daylight saving time switch could even be the last spring forward B.C. ever has as the province considers alternatives.

After the clocks change for most Canadians, it's only a short time until the first day of spring and the move towards warmer weather.

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