Is ice a sign of spring? Most people probably wouldn’t think so, however, Canada does things a bit differently. Newfoundland’s iceberg season is just getting started, and the first shelf was spotted outside of Bonavista.

Typically, bergs appear off the east coast of Labrador all the way down to the southeast coast of Newfoundland. This area is colloquially known as Iceberg Alley.

Newfoundland and Labrador’s official iceberg viewing site recommends late May and early June as the best time to catch a glimpse of the floating ice giants. However, the season stretches as far back as April.

Many of the giant frozen formations spotted off the coast break from Greenland’s western glaciers, before floating south to Canadian waters.

One of these bergs was also responsible for the sinking of the Titanic back in 1912.

If you happen to be in Newfoundland already, at exactly the right time, you might even be able to see whales, birds, and more during this season, from a safe distance, of course.

Photos shared on Twitter show just how great of a view the town’s residents have of their first 2020 berg. They first caught a glimpse of it near the end of March.

"The Cape Bonavista iceberg looks awesome under tonight's sky. #IcebergsNL #ShareYourWeather #nlwx" wrote Bonavista resident Mark Gray.

Gray posted a number of different photos of the sea ice cube, dating back to April 2.

 

The photos offer a great look at some of Canada's natural beauty.

Other residents also captured their own shots of the floating formation from afar.

"Probably not the best time for a swim #photography #canon #iceberg #ocean #bonavista" wrote @barrylangdon1.

"Got to love #iceberg season Red heart#AtlanticOcean #ruggedcoast #CapeBonavista #Bonavista #newfoundland" wrote @mobile_mentor1.

Only in Canada could a giant chunk of ice floating in the ocean be a sign that spring has finally sprung.

*Editor's note: Cover photo used for illustrative purposes. 

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