Nova Scotia is now home to some interesting new residents. Hurricane Dorian brought an array of U.S. birds, including a pelican, to the province. The brand new Nova Scotia pelican is definitely an interesting sight for locals in the aftermath of the storm.

When Hurricane Dorian hit Nova Scotia on Sept. 7, it came with strong winds, rain and intense storm surges which were to be expected out of a storm like that. But nobody expect it to bring birds from the coastal U.S. all the way up to Canada.

However, in the wake of the storm, a brown pelican and other birds not often seen in Nova Scotia have taken refuge in Cape Breton since the storm blew them there almost two weeks ago. 

The birds were most likely caught up in winds of Hurricane Dorian and blown off course when the storm brushed up along the coast of Florida and other southeastern states. 

David McCorquodale, a biology professor at Cape Breton University and an avid bird watcher, told CTV News that the birds knocked off course thanks to the hurricane include a pelican, terns and a black-necked stilt.

"And these are things that are all reasonably common on the coasts of Florida, Georgia, South Carolina," said McCorquodale. 

Despite the birds being an odd sight, people are sure enjoying them.

Jeannie Fraser saw the bird in person and told the Cape Breton Post that she was surprised how calm the bird was with all noise in the harbour.

"He was beautiful. So much detail in his neck. And his neck, the pouch where he catches food. He would stretch his neck out and bend it back. It was like he was preening the whole time. Like he was performing," she said. 

The pelican seems to be liking its time in Cape Breton. 

It's unknown if the birds will instinctively fly back to where they came from or if they'll become permanent residents in Nova Scotia. 

*Disclaimer: Cover photo used for illustrative purposes only. 


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