Tired of having to drag yourself down to The Beer Store or the LCBO at the end of a long week? Well, you might be in luck, as Ontario's Chamber of Commerce (OCC) has recommended making it easier to buy Ontario alcohol online. The province is looking to continue breaking up some of the tight restrictions that have been placed on alcohol sales for decades.

In a new report discussed in a media release published Monday, the OCC recommended widening where and how Ontarians can purchase booze online.

The key missions of the report, titled "Refreshing the Sale of Beverage Alcohol in Ontario," were outlined as follows:

  • Modernize the sale of alcohol by allowing producers to sell on e-commerce marketplaces and platforms and use third parties for payment.

  • Modernizing alcohol sales in Canada by allowing consumers to purchase alcohol online from other provinces/territories for home delivery.

  • Revamp alcohol tax, including reducing taxes on Ontario wines.

  • Allow provincial spirit and craft beer producers the freedom to sell their products at farmers’ markets.

  • Allowing airports to sell alcohol 24-hours-a-day.

OCC President and CEO, Rocco Rossi, explained: "Ontarians want to see a more modern, convenient beverage alcohol retail system and we are closer than ever to substantive reforms to how alcohol is distributed, bought, and sold in Ontario.

"By removing barriers and levelling the playing field, the province can unleash the potential of the beverage alcohol sector, support regional economic development, meet the needs of today’s consumer, and generate greater tax revenue to fund the public services on which Ontarians rely.

"The power of the beverage alcohol sector to be a force for economic growth extends beyond just the expected industries. The production, distribution, and sale of alcohol has a ripple effect that benefits agriculture, tourism and hospitality, and retail in all corners of the province."

Other recommendations outlined in the full report include allowing Ontario craft retailers to cross-sell their goods; adding spirits to the alcohol permitted for sale in corner, convenience, and big-box stores; and creating a new licence to facilitate private, independent wine stores.

There will surely be many Canadians across the province and country intrigued by the latest developments, particularly after seeing some regional LCBO stores struggling to fill shelves in recent times.

In its report, however, the OCC also stressed that, hand-in-hand with making alcohol more accessible, it would be mandating the stepping up of public information programs informing people about the dangers of alcohol consumption.

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