If you've ever taken Toronto transit or tried to drive through the city,  you know that's it not always easy to get around. While the TTC can often get you where you need to go, it is faced with delays and route closures quite often. Yet, if you decide to take a car, you're often stuck in lines of traffic. In fact, according to a new study done by the Toronto Foundation, it was discovered that Toronto has the "worst commute" of any major city in North America. 

It comes as no surprise that Toronto is a busy city. With a population of over 2.9 million people, the streets of the city can get a little hectic. However, according to "Toronto's Vital Signs Report" done by the Toronto Foundation, it is stated that the commute in Toronto is the worst in North America.

Not only is it the worst commute, but it is also considered to have the highest average commute times of any other major city in Canada. 

A study done last year showcased that Torontonians are spending over 350 hours commuting every year, which is actually more than any other city in the world. 

The new report, which looks at a variety of different factors of Torontonian living, including environment, work, health, and travel, focuses on just how tricky it is for the average citizen to get around the city. 

It's not just the long commute that got Toronto its title of the worst commute in North America. In fact, it seems that the cost of transit in the city is also increasing at an alarming rate. 

According to the report, the transit costs in the city have been increasing at twice the rate of inflation, which makes it harder for Toronto commuters to rely on and afford public transit. 

According to the report, even though Toronto has a high transit usage, the access that citizens get to this transit isn't even close to equal across the city. 

In fact, two-thirds of those who are unemployed across the city have very low access to transit, making it harder for them to find jobs across the city. 

Yet, Toronto might not hold the title of worst commute forever. With transportation continuing to grow, such as the much-anticipated Eglinton Crosstown line, and more investments being made, it will start to make public transit more accessible to those that aren't directly in the downtown core. 


There are stories everywhere. If you spot a newsworthy event in your city, send us a message, photo, or video @NarcityCanada on Twitter and Instagram.


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