November wasn't a great month for the job market. The unemployment rate in Canada hit 5.9 percent and is the highest its been in more than a year. With lots of jobs lost and unemployment, it's not the most wonderful time of year for some people.

Statistics Canada released information about the state of unemployment in the country which stated that the economy lost 71,200 jobs in November. 

Both full-time and part-time employment saw losses in November. Job hunting can already be a challenge, and with that many people out of work, the process is made that much harder.

According to the Financial Post, the increased unemployment rate, which is now 5.9% for November, is up from 5.5% in October, making it the biggest one-month jump since 2009.

Atlantic Canada in general, and Newfoundland and Labrador specifically, were hit the hardest by unemployment last month.

In that province, the rate of people who are jobless grew to 11.2%, which is the same rate of unemployed people as in Ontario and Quebec combined.

"Canada's jobs report is disappointing, showing job losses for the second month in a row," said Julia Pollak, labour economist at ZipRecruiter, to Bloomberg News.

If you've been having trouble finding a job, these numbers show you're not alone.

The other Atlantic provinces are right behind Newfoundland and Labrador with unemployment rates.

New Brunswick and P.E.I. both have a rate of 8% of people unemployed, while Nova Scotia is at 7.8%. 

The only other province that is close to the rates in Atlantic Canada is Alberta, where 7.2% of people are unemployed. 

Not having a job means not making money, and with only some parts of the country having affordable rent, the price of houses expected to rise again and food prices going up in 2020, it could be a tough year.

On a more positive note, half of the Canadian provinces are below the national unemployment rate of 5.9%.

Sneaking in just below that is Saskatchewan with 5.8%.

Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba all have the same rate of people without jobs at 5.6%. B.C. is the best province when it comes to employment, with the jobless rate there only at 5%.

While the numbers this past month are looking grim, not all hope is lost. The total number of jobs added this year is still up from what it was in November 2018. 

"Observers should remember that the numbers are highly volatile and that this is still the strongest year for job growth in Canada in 17 years," said Pollack.


There are stories everywhere. If you spot a newsworthy event in your city, send us a message, photo, or video @NarcityCanada on Twitter and Instagram.


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