For the second time in just two weeks, Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg has spoken publicly about the Wet’suwet’en solidarity protests in Canada. Taking to Twitter on Tuesday, the 17-year-old shared her support for the cause, urging her followers to do the same. Thunberg also shared a “Wet’suwet’en supporter toolkit,” which provides information about how to get involved in the pipeline protests.

Greta Thunberg has taken to Twitter once again to share her opinion about the ongoing Coastal GasLink protests that are taking place across Canada.

In a tweet early on Tuesday morning, the young activist shared a “Wet’suwet’en supporter toolkit” with her 4 million followers, which gives information about how people can get involved with the solidarity demonstrations.

Thunberg added the message, “Support the Wet’suwet’en Nation and the pipeline protests happening now in Canada! #WetsuwenStrong.”

Her post comes as marches and blockades continue to disrupt rail services across the country, and as tensions continue to rise between activists and the Canadian Government.

Last week, Wet’suwet’en supporters promised that they are "not going anywhere,” despite demonstrating in conditions of -24 C.

Just hours after it was posted, Thunberg's tweet had more than 1,500 retweets and 5,000 likes.

The toolkit that was shared as part of Thunberg’s tweet provides information about how people from across the globe can get involved in the Canadian solidarity protests.

Advice includes visiting the region to help protestors, fundraising for legal costs, contacting the Canadian Parliament to demand action, and signing pledges.

The website also has a wishlist page, where organizers can tell supporters what supplies they are in need of. 

This isn’t the first time that Thunberg has spoken out about the pipeline activism that’s happening in Canada.

Earlier this month, the 17-year-old took to Twitter to make her opinion on the matter known.

Retweeting a post from a Vancouver-based climate activist, Thunberg wrote, "Indigenous rights = Climate justice."

She added the hashtags "#WetsuwetenStrong” and “#KeepItInTheGround."

The Indigenous nation has been opposing the new Coastal GasLink pipeline since last year.

Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs say they have not given their consent to the construction project, and they have accused the company of violating traditional laws.

In a press release earlier this month, they explained, “The Dinï ze’ and Ts’akë ze’ [the hereditary chiefs] continue to resist colonial and gendered violence against Wet’suwet’en people, and to protect Wet’suwet’en lands for future generations.”

Comments are now closed.
Account Settings
Notifications
Favourites
Share Feedback
Log Out

Register this device to receive push notifications