How To Spot A Fake Event/ Concert Ticket So You Don't Get Ripped Off This Summer - Narcity

How To Spot A Fake Event/ Concert Ticket So You Don't Get Ripped Off This Summer

Don't waste money on disappointment.

Living in the digital age we know that there are scams just waiting to be clicked on all over the internet. Whether it's shady apartments deals or just hackers trying to rip off information, the world wide web is a place where fake everything is available. 

A big scam that many people deal with online is fake tickets for events. You could be looking to go to a sold out festival or trying to save a buck when you stumble across some faulty tickets that are only going to get you denied at the door. Nothing is more disappointing or embarrassing than buying tickets that are counterfeit. 

Today the website Ticketfly was targeted for what they referred to as a cyber incident in a tweet. Even the safe places to purchase are under threat of other intentions. 

The most recent ticket dupe is for amusement park tickets that have apparently been fooling families. Wet'N'Wild Toronto is issuing a reminder that if you're purchasing tickets from third-party websites, you probably won't be making it past their security gates this summer. The OPP even warned about this as far back as the summer of 2016. 

Steve Mayer, the manager of the water park, told CityNews Toronto that with everything being online and printable it can be almost impossible to tell the difference between a real and fake ticket.  

@j3rwardembedded via  

Though it's nearly impossible there are a few signs you can look for so you don't get completely ripped off when you buy cheap tickets. Sometimes it's just some good people trying to get them off their hands. There are a few occasions I have been that person myself. 

If you are going to buy tickets from a third-party seller here are some things to keep in mind. Always be sure to check the spelling, printing quality, and that words aren't abbreviated. Be wary of comma's on dates and spaces between times as well because this can indicate a fake ticket. 

@chrisgangaiembedded via  

Another useful tip on how to ensure you have real tickets is to log onto the website link associated with the event on your ticket. If it leads you to nowhere you'll know that you've got a dupe. 

When you're buying multiples for your friends or family the serial number under the barcode should be consecutive with the seat numbers. Another good way to confirm is to make sure that the printing matches the ticket paper.  

It should go without saying that you should never post tickets on social media. No matter what, if it seems to good to be true, then it probably is! 

Source: CityNews Toronto, DetectAFake

 

 

Share on Facebook

Keep on reading

Recommended for you

Kailie Annetts Can be found drinking coffee, playing with kitties, or yelling about something. Residing in the depths of Parkdale, Toronto. Catch up on my insta adventures: @kailiecat.