While the Hurricane Season in Florida doesn't start until June, the Sunshine State isn't immune to severe weather. Our tropical landscape surrounded by coastal waters and constant fluctuations in unpredictable weather can still happen. Weather forecasts in Central Florida spell severe storms this evening, and you may want to prepare.

As stated in today's weather forecast from the U.S. National Weather Service of Melbourne, Central Floridians are looking at some pretty severe storms as a long line of thunderstorms roll into the state.

These storms follow a fast-moving cold front pushing its way into the state.

The path of the upcoming storms is expected to move through the eastern side of Central Florida near Melbourne and Vero Beach during the evening hours, with the main threats being strong wind gusts well over 60 miles per hour, including frequent strikes of lightning.

Possibly even more alarming is the potential threat of tornadoes. It's expected that one to two will form as wind gusts build and the cold front meets our warmer weather lines.

This warning was posted to Facebook by the U.S. National Weather Service of Melbourne, alerting residents and visitors of the potential dangers to come from these developing lofty storms.

While it's considered uncommon for tornadoes to reach the higher levels of recorded strength, even the smallest tornadoes come with danger and can do a world of damage — so it's always important to be prepared.

The U.S. National Weather Service urges visitors and residents alike to have multiple ways prepared to receive warnings about these developing storms, as the severe weather will continue throughout the evening and overnight hours.

Despite the upcoming severe weather, as of this time, theme parks have not posted any closing notifications.

It's important to make sure your devices are charged and ready to go. As if we'd really want to go without our phone if the power happens to go out, right? 

You can learn more about this weather forecast and upcoming developments through the U.S. National Weather Service's website here or keep an eye on their Facebook feed for additional notifications.

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