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If you've read Stephen King's The Mist, then Ontario's weather is likely to give you a case of the heebie-jeebies on Thursday morning.

According to The Weather Network (TWN), a dense fog rolled into southern Ontario overnight on Wednesday, prompting widespread travel advisories and motorists being warned of reduced visibility.

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Ontario's weather has been full of surprises this month. Forecasts went from barbecue worthy to full-on winter in a matter of days, and experts don't think November's final weeks will be any less chaotic.

According to The Weather Network (TWN), a "drastic pattern change" will finish off November thanks to the Pacific flow ending and a polar vortex gradually sinking south across Canada.

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The switch has been flipped, folks — Ontario has gone full-on winter. After a mild start to November, last weekend's onslaught of squalls proved that the province would not only get snow ahead of the new year but more than most can handle.

According to The Weather Network (TWN), some of Ontario's most affected regions were buried in over 100 centimetres of snow by the time the weekend was over, thanks to a pattern of "intense and powerful snow squalls."

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Motorists, beware! Ontario weather will be far from suitable to drive in this weekend, with rounds of heavy snow squalls expected to make travel "impossible" at times.

According to The Weather Network (TWN), regions east and northeast of Lake Huron, Georgian Bay and Lake Ontario will be hit the hardest by the wintry pattern, with residents warned to look out for rapidly deteriorating conditions.

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As round after round of Ontario snow sweeps across the southern regions, police are taking to social media to warn motorists about deteriorating driving conditions.

Toronto Police Services (TPS) took to Twitter on Tuesday afternoon to caution residents against travelling in the weather without winter tires, stating that the flurries have resulted in "slippery roads."

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