The Sunshine State continues to shatter the wrong kind of records. As COVID-19 cases surpass 3,000, Florida hospitals' ICU beds are filling up. The state is reporting that a majority of its hospital beds are occupied.

Florida recorded 3,207 new COVID-19 cases on Thursday, breaking the record just set on Monday. This record spike comes as the state's intensive care beds fill with patients.

According to the state's Agency for Health Care Administration, some of the state's counties have seen their ICU bed occupancy increase. In Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach County, all three have under 30% of their intensive care beds available, with Broward being the lowest at 20.91%.

Some officials say that while there is a rise in COVID-19 cases the hospitalization is still low and patients are not in critical condition.

A spokesperson for Wellington Regional Hospital told the Sun-Sentinel that while the ER is seeing a "decent number of COVID-19 patients," people are being sent home.

"The majority of those who need to be hospitalized are going into the ICU, and we have the ability to create more beds if needed," Allen Poston said.

In Jacksonville, Dr. Marko Perdic of UF Health Jacksonville told News4Jax that "we are getting a mixed bag. We’re probably seeing more of those patients who are not requiring a higher level of care.” 

He went on to say that those admitted were "symptomatic patients with sore throats, high fevers, a lot of shortness of breath, but not as (many) in critical condition. And that goes for all ages.”

On Wednesday, Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry said the city's COVID-19 hospitalizations were still low, despite businesses closing in the area following patrons and employees testing positive for the virus.

As it currently stands, open ICU beds in Duval County currently sit at 25%, with only 113 beds available.

In response to the continual increase in cases, Gov. Ron DeSantis said during his Tuesday press conference that he would not be "shutting down" the state but would continue to proceed with his recovery plan.