A Canadian man is going viral after posting a video of himself dancing after getting a COVID-19 vaccine dose.

Gurdeep Pandher, a Yukon resident, spoke to Narcity about his dance style, the history behind it, his life in northern Canada and being an online sensation. 

Pandher explained on Twitter that he went outside after getting the dose and jammed out, adding that he's happy to raise "awareness" about the vaccine.

His video received over two million views. 

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What do you love about dancing?

Pandher said that dancing makes him and those around him feel joy.

"I like that dancing makes me happy, other people in my community happy, and the world happy," he told Narcity.

Pandher also explained that his style of dance is called bhangra, and is a traditional Punjabi dance

"Farmers of Punjab created bhangra hundreds of years ago. They used to dance bhangra after harvesting their crops to celebrate the hard work," he explained 

Pandher has been vocal about the situation happening in India following the Indian government's new laws regarding farming in the region. 

How long have you lived in Yukon?

Pandher said he has been living in the territory for 10 years.

"I love that the Yukon is a place where you find exceptional wilderness, open spaces, fabulous lakes and stunning wildlife," he said.

Pandher shares that he was born in Siahar, a small village in Punjab where the community was like a family.

"I found that sort of connection and belongingness in the small community of the Yukon."

Pandher lives in a small and cozy cabin and even has a "kilt-wearing, bagpipe-blowing" neighbour.

What's your most viral video ever?

Pandher said his most viral video was of him dancing bhangra in "the Yukon's -45 degrees celsius temperature."

He also got to teach the mayor of Whitehorse how to dance bhangra, and even taught him how to wear a Sikh turban.

He says that, overall, his most popular content is usually of him dancing in some serious sub-zero temperatures.

"In the Yukon, we get very long and cold winters. Therefore, people like it when I do warm dancing in such severe cold temperatures," he said.