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An Alberta Restaurant Created The Best Caesar In Canada & It Has Some Unusual Ingredients

If you love a good drink, you might want to consider taking a trip to Alberta to try out Canada's best caesar.

A restaurant called Sorso Lounge in Airdrie has won the "Best Caesar In Town" title for its "Suffering Caesar" creation in a competition run by Mott's Clamato Caesar.

The restaurant also took home a grand prize of $25,000 after competing among 255 restos from coast to coast for the top spot.

In his video submission, managing partner London Richard from Sorso Lounge whipped up a Caesar "inspired by Guatemalan Worry Dolls, which reflected his travel experiences over the years," according to a press release.

Sorso Lounge - Airdrie, AB - Finalist www.youtube.com

Richard's video was one of ten videos shared on Mott's Clamato's website, where Canadians voted to help choose the grand prize winner.

The yummy-looking drink has some wild ingredients, like fermented black garlic, pineapple rum, mango nectar, coconut Worcestershire and, of course, Mott's Clamato Caesar. The ice cubes even have bone marrow in them.

"My whole body started shaking as I wasn't expecting it since the competition was so fierce," Richard said about his win in the press release.

Sorso Lounge decided to give the prize money to various local charities, including Airdrie's health foundation as a way of paying back the community that supported them during the COVID-19 pandemic.

"The community was there for us when we needed them, so now it's our turn to support them," said Richard.

Mott's Clamato also decided to give the nine runner-ups $10,000 each.

"We wanted to give back to the industry that made the Caesar, and after a challenging year, we couldn't think of a better way than offering them some much needed money to rejuvenate their businesses," said Mott's Clamato Brand Manager Kassandra Falvo.

"We also donated $50,000 to the Bartender's Benevolent Fund to individually support our country's talented bartenders."

In Alberta, proof of vaccination may be required to access some events, services and businesses, including restaurants and bars.