Travellers who’ve tested positive for COVID-19 can still cross the Canada-U.S. border, according to the federal government’s travel restrictions.

As of February 15, anybody hoping to cross Canada's land border is required to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours before departure.

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Travellers can present a positive COVID-19 molecular test taken between 14 and 90 days prior to departure. Government of Canada

However, according to official travel advice, it’s also possible to cross by showing a positive COVID-19 molecular test.

This test, though, must have been taken between 14 and 90 days prior to the traveller’s departure.

Previously, there were fewer rules in place at Canada’s land borders than air borders, although provisions have recently been ramped-up.

While those crossing the Canada-U.S. land border are not required to stay in one of the government’s pre-approved quarantine hotels, they will need to take several COVID-19 tests to gain entry.

A recent infographic shared by the Government of Canada explains exactly what all land travellers will have to do before and after arriving at the Canadian land border.

Failure to comply with ongoing land or air travel restrictions could result in fines of up to $750,000 or even jail time.