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These True Crime Stars Revealed What It Was Like Investigating Canada's Oldest Cold Case

"If anyone was going to solve it, it's going to be us."

Harold Heaven vanished from his cabin in Minden, Ontario 87 years ago and was never seen again.

In their new crime series For Heaven's Sake, Heaven's great-great-nephew, Mike Mildon and his friend Jackson Rowe attempt to solve the disappearance using their amateur detective skills. 

Mixed with comedy and intrigue, the 8-episode series was officially released on Paramount+ and CBC Gem on March 4, 2021.

Mildon and Rowe chatted with Narcity about their experience trying to solve Canada's oldest cold case.

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What inspired you to investigate the case?

With a background in comedy, investigating a cold case was a whole new world to Mildon and Rowe. 

After finding 1934 police reports, Mildon says, "everything spiralled from there and we asked the question, maybe we could make our own true crime."

"Jackson and I were naive and very excited," he laughs.

"We had in the back of our minds, if we took the town by storm and tried to get as many people talking, [...] we really thought we could solve it."

"We knew that we had new technology, we had outreach, we had some funding, and if anyone was going to solve it, it's going to be us," Rowe says. 

What was the community's reaction to your investigation?

"They all came together and got excited when we were excited," Mildon says.

"We would have mystery nights at the Dominion Hotel, which is a local bar, and [...] we would have people coming back and listening to our theories and adding their 2 cents. It was a real community effort."

"It was very heartwarming," Rowe adds. "[...] As soon as we won them over and they became invested in our story and our journey, we felt like there are more people who want the answer and there's a little more riding on our little documentary."

"It was a blessing, having everyone help out."

What was the most intriguing part of the case?

"For us it was that night that he disappeared or the way his cabin was left," Mildon explains.

"[...] Having to look at things through two lenses, a 2020 lens and 1934 lens was a unique part of the story," Rowe says.

"It's what helped us learn a lot about Minden, Canada, and the Heaven family throughout the years. That was very interesting too."

Mildon also feels that the documentary was a special way to connect with his family.

"It's such a great time capsule," he expresses, "10 years from now, some of those family members you see in the documentary might not be around, so it's a very warm feeling to spend that time interviewing them."