For two months, the oceanfront of this famed South Florida city stood in an eerily stillness. Today, beaches in Miami reopen to beachgoers. It's time to catch some summer rays, but there will be a few changes to expect before you hit the sandy shores.  

From Sunny Isles Beach to South Beach, the gates that blocked off access have been replaced with the sounds of people splashing in the crystal blue waters.

Besides the infamous Miami Beach, spots like Bal Harbour, Crandon Park, Golden Beach, Haulover Park, Key Biscayne, Matheson Hammock Park, Miami Beach, Sunny Isles Beach, Surfside Beach, and Virginia Key got the OK to open.

As a part of Miami-Dade County guidelines for reopening the shorelines, the experience will be different than before.

While people can sunbathe, work out (just not on exercise equipment), and fix their tan lines, coolers will not be allowed. So sorry, no darties just yet. And you'll have to get used to leaving the beach early as the oceanfront will close nightly at 8 p.m.

Beach Ambassadors have also been hired to enforce social distancing and other "new normal" measures, like keeping groups to 10 people or less and making sure visitors are wearing a mask.

Swimmers, however, won't have to keep their face coverings on while in the ocean.

Also, your furry friends and any fishing equipment will have to be left at home, and all water fountains and other "interactive displays" will be closed.

Concessions will be permitted, as long as they're up to county and CDC guidelines. 

The news of the beach reopening comes a week after they were expected to open. After weekend protests against police brutality broke out in South Florida, the county pushed the date back and implemented nightly curfews. 

Since Monday, these time restrictions have been lifted.

Along with the beaches, gyms and tattoo parlors can welcome guests back following phase 2 of Florida's plan to reopen, though it's unclear when Miami nightclubs will come back to this party state.