Canada Is Building A Northern Lights Resort With Giant Glass Igloos

It's no secret that Canada is one of the best places in the world for northern lights tourism. So why not build an resort dedicated entirely to it?

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It's an idea currently being pursued by Fort McMurray Tourism, an Alberta-based agency that, according to its CEO Frank Creasey, is "looking to at getting ahead of the demand" for unique aurora experiences in the north.

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Fort McMurray is a prime location for viewing the northern lights in Canada. While they tend to be strongest between October to March, the lights also make frequent appearances over the town during the summer, on warm, cloudless nights. This opens up opportunities for year-round tourism.

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Fort McMurray is also looking to appeal to the same travellers that give great business to the Northwest Territories. Just recently, an NWT community signed a partnership deal with a Chinese tour company in order to boost tourism numbers in the area. It's a good move, considering that visitations to the Northwest Territories by travellers from China, Korea and Japan have skyrocketed in the past few years due to its great aurora-viewing opportunties.

The northern lights resort would be similar to the famous Kakslauttanen Arctic Resort in Finland, which features characteristic glass igloos that allow guests to view the auroras from the comfort of their beds. Fort McMurray Tourism is hoping to make the resort a reality within the next five to ten years.

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