One of the most important parts of fighting against the pandemic is a reliable way of knowing who has COVID-19. A new Canada COVID-19 test being developed could help. It would deliver results in seconds and doesn't even have to go up your nose.

The new method is being developed by Graphene Leaders Canada (GLC) and their subsidiary GLC Medical. 

In a July 30 news release, the company outlined some of the benefits of the test, which would utilize a newly created graphene-enhanced sensor.

Unlike the current swabs that plenty of people are probably used to seeing by now, this sensor is designed to actually detect the presence of the virus rather than the antibodies that develop after infection, which is not always reliable.

This would help to eliminate false positives and negatives, according to the company.

In addition, the test wouldn't require practitioner oversight or expensive equipment to read results. Fewer people handling the samples through the process would help to lower the chance of cross-contamination.

The GLC test also uses a saliva sample, rather than a nasal swab. That means that you wouldn't have to have something stuck so far up your nose that it goes "all the way inside your thoughts," as Drake would say.

"The success of this development offers the world a solution for COVID-19, and as our graphene is tailorable, we can offer a fast solution to future virus' in rapid modification of our graphene which will ensure we do not relive the major economic shutdown as experienced with COVID-19," Donna Mandau, President and CEO of GLC-GLC Medical said in a statement.

GLC is currently in talks with different manufacturers and other countries to figure out production protocols.

GLC Medical is calling this an "at the door" test, indicating that it could be utilized at restaurants, sport and concert venues, or before boarding a plane.

Air Canada has seen the value in rapid testing and is working with a different company to develop a COVID-19 test that can be given to passengers prior to flying.

In addition to developing new testing procedures, Canada has also recently approved a new treatment for hospital patients with COVID-19.

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