Following a recent update, Canada’s travel rules now require the majority of incoming travellers to provide a negative COVID-19 test before entering the country. 

However, there are some exceptions to this rule.

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There are only a limited number of exceptions where an individual is not required to show proof of a negative test. Government of Canada

The federal government has laid out the types of travellers that are exempt from providing a negative COVID-19 test upon their arrival and it includes essential workers, young children and government officials.

Examples of essential workers include those in the trade and transportation sector (like truck drivers and crew members on aircraft), emergency service providers (like firefighters and paramedics) and eligible government officials (like employees of the Government of Canada, border service officers and law enforcement officials).

If entering for work purposes, Canadian Armed Forces members are also permitted to skip the pre-arrival testing requirement.

Also exempt are people who have tested positive for the illness between 14 and 90 days before travelling (providing they have proof of this positive test.)

Children under four years of age are not required to show a test, and neither are air passengers in transit through Canada who aren’t stopping in the country.

When it comes to the land border, frequent cross-border workers, who must leave and re-enter Canada regularly for work purposes, are also exempt.

People living in integrated trans-border communities have also been given the go-ahead to cross Canada's land borders without proof of a COVID-19 test.

While all Canadians do have a legal right to enter the country via land, even without a negative COVID-19 test, those who do not comply could face fines of up to $3,000.