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Climate Change Could Affect Sea Levels Across Canada & Some Cities Could End Up Underwater

A map shows which spots are the most at risk, and it doesn't look good for B.C.

Climate Change Could Affect Sea Levels Across Canada & Some Cities Could End Up Underwater

Research has revealed the places in Canada that could be the most affected by climate change if sea levels rise and some cities could actually end up underwater.

Climate Central, an independent organization of scientists and journalists who research climate change and its impacts on people, has released a map of the world that shows which spots could be submerged by rising sea levels. The risk map highlights areas that could be below the tideline after 1.5 degrees of global warming in blue and after 3 degrees of global warming in red.

Climate Central and Google

When it comes to which parts of Canada could be affected, much of the lower mainland in B.C. — including Richmond, Delta, Port Coquitlam and places along the Fraser River — is expected to be underwater in the 1.5-degree warming scenario, and that extends even further in the 3-degree warming scenario.

Areas on the shore of Hudson Bay in Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec are expected to be below the tideline as well if sea levels rise. The same goes for places along the St. Lawrence River.

According to Climate Central, coastal areas of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E.I. and Newfoundland could also be affected by global warming, with parts of Halifax, Charlottetown, St. John's and Moncton submerged underwater in both warming scenarios.

Recently, a report by the Canadian Institute for Climate Choices found that many people are "largely unaware" of how they'll be impacted by the effects of climate change on things like buildings, roads and power supplies in Canada. Almost 1 million buildings in Canada could be at risk for "major damage" because of flooding, the report said.

Ontario's Great Lakes aren't nearly as chilly as they should be this month, and it's already causing bizarre effects on weather conditions.

According to The Weather Network, the Great Lakes are warmer this October than they've been in over 25 years, creating the opportunity for heavy showers and even some waterspouts.

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The Queen has been overheard criticizing world leaders over their lack of action towards climate change.

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A new map has been published showing what areas are going to be suffering the most as sea levels rise, and looking at Vancouver is scary.

The research was released by Climate Central and shows a map with areas at risk. The red on the map highlights the tideline if temperatures rise 3 C due to global warming, and the blue highlights it after 1.5 C.

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Climate Change Could Impact So Many Canadians Who Are 'Unaware' That They're At Risk

A report said almost 1 million buildings in Canada could be at risk for "major damage" from flooding.

When it comes to climate change in Canada, it turns out that plenty of people in the country might not even know they could be majorly impacted by what's to come, a report says.

According to a report by the Canadian Institute for Climate Choices on the costs that climate change could have on Canada's infrastructure, many people are "largely unaware" of how the effects of climate change on things like buildings, roads and power supplies in Canada will impact them.

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