This is some pretty hot weather for the north. Alert, Nunavut broke a heat record for the month of June. It's the most northern inhabited region in the world and is located in Canada's Arctic.

On June 28, the temperature in Alert reached 18.8 C, which beat out the previous record from 20 years earlier.

That's because an upper-level ridge and clear skies created conditions that were just right for the temperature to rise.

The hottest the month had been before this was 18.2 C in 2000.

While it wasn't the unrelenting heat that some parts of Canada have seen recently, it's still cause for concern.

According to The Weather Network, nearing 20 C now is alarming because it's usually only around 5 C at this time of the year.

While Alert was breaking a heat record, a bunch of cities further south were colder than normal and colder than the northernmost settlement in the country.

Temps in Calgary rose to 14.5 C on that same day.

The new June record for the region isn't that far off from the hottest temperature that has ever been recorded there.

That was 20 C on August 8, 1956.

This isn't the only time that Canada's north has brought the heat recently.

On July 1, Yellowknife was forecasted to be 22 C — hotter than four major provincial cities.

Vancouver was supposed to reach 17 C and Calgary was one degree colder than that.

Just a week before Alert broke its June record, another arctic spot saw warmer than usual weather.

A Siberian town reached 38 C which could be the hottest it's ever been within the Arctic Circle.

Speaking of which, between February and April of this year, there was a huge record-breaking hole in the ozone from Hudson Bay to Siberia.

It was brought on by freezing conditions and the polar vortex.

Once the temps warmed up a bit, the hole was able to close.

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