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Halloween In Canada Could Be So Different This Year & House Parties Are Probably A No-Go

If you’ve got big plans for October 31, you might have to reschedule. Ottawa’s top doctor has revealed she expects COVID-19 to stick around through the fall, and she’s advising trick-or-treaters to rethink their usual spooky antics. Halloween in Canada is going to look different in 2020, that’s for sure!

In years gone by, staple Halloween activities have included trick-or-treating, partying, dressing up and visiting bars and clubs, and sharing candy, of course.

However, Ottawa’s Medical Officer of Health is urging Canadians to be prepared for a different kind of spooky celebration this year, as she’s warning that COVID-19 concerns will be sticking around through October.

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Speaking to CTV Morning Live on August 20, Dr. Vera Etches explained that Halloween 2020 could be more tricks than treats.

"I don't think so. If normal means going door-to-door and touching things that other people have touched. I think we're going to have to be creative," she said.

While the top doctor noted that it would still be safe to dress-up, she suggested trick-or-treating and indoor partying is likely to be a no-no.

“It's the coming into close contact with others we'll need to rethink," Etches added.

Although she acknowledged that the risk of exposure via candy is low, the health officer noted that limiting as many risks as possible is still important.

When it comes to indoor Halloween parties and celebrating in large numbers, COVID-19 concerns are more significant.

"It's the close contact indoors that's the most high risk for transmission, but we're trying to be as careful as we can,” said Etches.

The doctor’s comments come as an increasing number of young people in Ontario, and across Canada, are being diagnosed with COVID-19.

In fact, people between 20 and 39 years old have recently beat out seniors for having the largest number of cases.

In Toronto, the city even has plans to spam millennials on TikTok, in an attempt to educate young people about the illness.

While fright-night plans may have to be altered this year, Dr. Etches is confident that Canadians will still find a way to celebrate safely.

"This has been a great time of adaptation ... We've seen people in Ottawa change the way they're going about their days, and I think this is another one where we'll have to look at it and be creative," she concluded.

Whatever your plans for October 31, we can all probably agree that 2020 has been frightening enough already. Yikes!

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