Welcome to paradise. Hidden in the prairies, you'll find a tropical beach that looks just the Caribbean. But what makes Little Limestone Lake truly unbelievable is the water actually changes colour throughout the day.

Five hours north of Winnipeg, Manitoba, you'll find the largest colour-changing marl lake in the world. It's just like those retro mood rings; its hues change as the hours go by.

Early in the day, it has a bright turquoise colour. But by the afternoon, it has a striking new look, a gorgeous shade of robin egg blue. 

The cause of the change is the temperature. As the lake warms up, the calcium carbonate separates, creating calcite crystals in the water, but as it cools, they dissolve. 

Just like Iceland's famous Blue Lagoon, the lake can have a milky aquamarine shade. 

But the next time you visit, it could look radically different. You might find yourself floating in crystal clear water.

It makes it exciting, as you can spend the entire day there and see the water alter right before your eyes. The changes will be even more dramatic if there's a significant fluctuation in the temperature.

After you see one photo of the lake, you'll want to go. 

You could spend the entire day swimming and paddleboarding with your friends.

It's hard not to fall in love with the long stretches of pristine white shores and turquoise waters.

Plus, unlike your past summer vacations in Jamaica or Punta Cana, there won't be huge crowds around. Often, it can feel like you have a slice of heaven all to yourself.

We don't know about you, but we already added this spot to our summer bucket list.

If you happen to be planning a road trip across the Prairies, you'll want to stop here for an afternoon of fun. 

Little Limestone Lake

Price: Free

Address: Little Limestone Lake Provincial Park, MB

Why You Need To Go: Take a dip in this hidden gem that really does change colours.


We strongly advise that before you go swimming or visit any location, you check the most recent updates on potential hazards, security, water quality, and closures. If you do plan to visit a location, respect the environment and obey any local laws.


 


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