Whole Foods In Canada Won't Let Employees Wear Poppies Because Of A Strict Policy

A strict policy means for employees at Whole Foods in Canada, poppies are a no-go this year. 

The grocery chain, which has 14 locations across Canada, has banned employees from wearing a poppy for Remembrance Day because it doesn't comply with their uniform rules. 

"Whole Foods Market honours the men and women who have and continue to bravely serve their country," a spokesperson for the company said. "With the exception of those items required by law, our dress code policy prohibits any additions to our standard uniform."*

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14 Whole Foods locations across Canada

One employee told CBC that she was informed by her supervisor that allowing people to don the commemorative pins would be supporting a cause. 

Basically, she was told if they allow this one cause they would have to consider others, she said. 

According to the report, the grocery giant wouldn't elaborate on the reason for banning poppies but will be acknowledging Remembrance Day in other ways. 

The spokesperson confirmed that they're donating to the Legion's poppy campaign and will be observing a moment of silence in their stores on November 11.* 

The Legion has had to take extra measures this year amid the pandemic, including the introduction of contactless payment boxes. 

*Editor's note: This story has been updated. 

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