Canada's Vaccine Advisory Committee Says Booster Doses Can Now Be Offered To Everyone Over 18

This comes after the federal government asked for updated guidance because of the Omicron variant.

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Canada's Vaccine Advisory Committee Says Booster Doses Can Now Be Offered To Everyone Over 18

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization has officially updated guidance on the use of COVID-19 booster doses in Canada to include everyone over the age of 18 years old.

On December 3, the committee released new recommendations on who should and can be offered another dose in Canada based on current scientific evidence and expert opinion.

Now, NACI "strongly recommends" that a booster dose of an authorized mRNA COVID-19 vaccine be offered to people aged 50 years and older at least six months after the completion of a primary series.

This guidance also includes adults living in long-term care homes for seniors or other congregate living settings for seniors, people who received only viral vector vaccines (AstraZeneca/COVISHIELD or Janssen/Johnson & Johnson vaccines), adults in or from First Nations, Inuit and Métis communities and all frontline health care workers who have direct in-person contact with patients.

NACI is now also recommending that a booster dose of an authorized mRNA COVID-19 vaccine be offered to adults between 18 and 49 years of age at least six months after the completion of a primary series.

"Booster doses of COVID-19 mRNA vaccines can increase the immune response and are expected to offer enhanced protection against infection and severe disease and may help reduce spread of infection," NACI said.

This change comes after federal government officials asked the committee to review guidance on the use of boosters in light of the discovery of the Omicron variant.

Just a day before the new recommendation from NACI was announced, Ontario revealed that eligibility for boosters would expand as of December 13 to people 50 years of age and older along with others who are at a high risk of getting sick.

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