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A Relationship Expert Just Revealed The Best & Worst Photos To Use On Hinge

You might want to rethink the gym selfie!

Having a good dating app profile can make or break your chances of meeting that special someone.

If you've been wondering about the best photos to use on Hinge, then look no further.

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Logan Ury is the director of relationship science at hinge and the author of the recently published book, How To Not Die Alone.

She spoke with Narcity about which photos you should include on your dating profile, and which you should keep on your camera roll.

What photos should I include?

Ury suggests using photos that "[...] really give us a clear sense of who you are."

She says that your first photo should be an unobstructed image of your face.

She also says that including a variety of pictures is key.

"People want to see that clear headshot, they want to see a picture of your full body, they want to see you doing an activity you love."

"It's also helpful to include a photo of you with your family or friends because this reinforces the idea that you have an active social life."

What photos should I avoid?

Ury says to avoid photos where your face is hidden by things like filters or sunglasses and group photos where it isn't clear who you are.

"It's not really contributing to us getting to know what you look like."

She also warns against photos that show you smoking and, believe it or not, gym selfies.

"Gym selfies tend to perform really poorly; only 3% of successful Hinge profiles include gym selfies."

What about videos?

While Ury hasn't done any specific studies on videos, she says that they could help to show your character.

"The overall goal is to show us who you are, so if you have a great video of you being really silly [...] that really reveals a part of your personality, then that's great."

Generic videos, such as a film through a plane window when taking off, aren't as relevant.

"That doesn't really contribute to us knowing who you are, and everything should be in service of really showing us your personality," she says.