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Protestors In Manitoba & BC Ripped Down Multiple Statues On Canada Day (VIDEOS)

A statue of Captain Cook ended its day in the Pacific Ocean.

This article contains graphic content that might not be suitable for some readers.

Three statues in Winnipeg, Manitoba, and Victoria, B.C., were toppled on Canada Day, part of a growing movement of protests and rallies against Canada's colonial history after recent grave discoveries at former residential schools.

Activists dressed in orange were filmed pulling down a Queen Victoria statue and a Captain Cook statue, prompting an investigation from local police and even a condemnation from the British government.

These incidents took place months after several other high-profile topplings, including one of Egerton Ryerson in Toronto and John A. McDonald in Montreal.

In Victoria, a group of protestors toppled a statue of Captain James Cook, who landed on Vancouver Island in the 18th century. After knocking the statue off its pedestal, it was thrown into the Inner Harbour.


Victoria police are still looking for suspects in the statue toppling incident, posting photos to Twitter in an attempt to crack down on the property damage.

Meanwhile, in Winnipeg, another group of protestors toppled a statue of Queen Victoria outside of Manitoba's Legislative Building. Another statue of Queen Elizabeth II was also toppled, according to the BBC.

The BBC also reports that while the British government's thoughts are with Canada's Indigenous community, the government "obviously condemn[s]" the topplings.

The Indian Residential School Survivors Society Emergency Crisis Line is available across Canada 24/7. Those who may need support can call 1-866-925-4419.