One Ontario university is now taking action on students who aren't practicing proper social distancing measures. Queen's University parties can now end in expulsion if the gathering is deemed a threat to the community. The principal of the university announced that this applies to both on and off-campus housing. 

In a Wednesday statement, Patrick Deane, principal and vice-chancellor at Queen's wrote that the university will be holding students accountable for their actions. 

He noted that large parties have been a concern since the return to campus.

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"Gatherings of this sort have occurred in the university district and they must stop," Deane wrote. 

Bylaw and police officers have been on the scene to respond to any festivities being thrown, and they're cracking down.

In fact, first offenders can now get fined $2,000 in Kingston for ignoring social distancing rules, while the maximum fine is $100,000. 

However, because of reports that some students are still overlooking the risks, school authorities are now also stepping in. 

"While Kingston Police and bylaw officers have been responding to these gatherings, some students continue to engage in risky behaviour [...] The university will take action to hold accountable those who flagrantly disregard these risks."

Police have been patrolling the university district since the beginning of orientation week.

Still, there were so many parties happening that the area was actually called an "outbreak incubator" by a Queen's professor. 

Now, the university has made it clear that anyone who insists on breaking the rules might be sacrificing their enrollment in the school.

"Any student whose behaviour ignores provincial and other applicable regulations and is identified as a potential community safety risk, will be referred for review under our Student Code of Conduct and will be subject to sanctions available under the Code, including expulsion from the university," says the statement. 

The principal stressed that all students are expected to adhere to the school's codes of conduct and that it "is not just disappointing but increasingly concerning" that people are posing threats to the community by partying.

Furthermore, concern was expressed not only that people were hosting large functions, but that hand washing, distancing, and mask-wearing is not taking place.

Queen's isn't the only school dealing with partying issues. 

Waterloo also reported a 100-person house party near Wilfrid Laurier University last week. 

The mayor of London, Ontario also confirmed that the city will be cracking down on party-goers.