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Canada’s National Day for Truth & Reconciliation Is Coming & Here’s What You Need To Know

Multiple provinces will not recognize September 30 as a statutory holiday.👇

Canada’s National Day for Truth & Reconciliation Is Coming & Here’s What You Need To Know

On September 30, Canada will recognize its first formal National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.

The new statutory holiday — which coincides with Orange Shirt Day — has been described by the feds as an opportunity to "recognize and commemorate the legacy of residential schools" in Canada. It is also an opportunity to honour all of the First Nation, Métis and Inuit survivors of residential schools, as well as their communities.

The holiday follows a call to action by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, back in 2015.

All federal employees and workers in federally regulated workplaces will be given the day off, but some Canadian provinces have chosen not to recognize September 30 as a provincial statutory holiday.

This includes New Brunswick, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Alberta and Ontario, although individual employers in some regions have been encouraged to treat it as a provincial public holiday.

In Nunavut, only Government of Nunavut officials will reportedly be given the day off. The region says it did not have enough time to amend existing legislation before September 30, but it aims to make the date a formal statutory holiday across the territory by next year.

In B.C., officials have only advised provincial public sector employers to honour the day, although most schools will be closed.

On the other hand, Newfoundland and Labrador, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Northwest Territories and Yukon have followed the federal government's lead and will recognize the holiday for many workers. Schools will be closed in most cases and many employees will have the day off work.

Private companies and organizations are able to decide how they want to honour September 30 in Canada.

The Indian Residential School Survivors Society Emergency Crisis Line is available across Canada 24/7. Those who may need support can call 1-866-925-4419.

Ontario Is Lighting Up Orange To Honour First National Day For Truth And Reconciliation

"It is vital that we commemorate the loss of generations who are no longer with us."

Ontario is turning orange on Thursday to commemorate the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.

Several provincial landmarks including Niagara Falls and the CN Tower will be lit bright orange tonight to honour the new holiday, with the falls shining for 15 minutes every hour, starting at 6:30 p.m.

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Trudeau Says September 30 Is A 'Day To Remember The Many Children Who Never Returned Home'

He spoke about the "painful and lasting impacts of residential schools in Canada."

This article contains graphic content that might not be suitable for some readers.

On September 30 — Canada's first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau issued a statement addressing the "painful and lasting impacts of residential schools in Canada."

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Doug Ford Says The Journey Of September 30 Needs To Happen 'Each & Every Day'

Today is the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.

Premier Doug Ford and Minister of Indigenous Affairs Greg Rickford released a statement on Thursday on the importance of Orange Shirt Day and the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.

"Today, people in Ontario and across Canada will wear orange shirts to remember and honour the many Indigenous children who were taken from their communities and families and forced to attend residential schools," reads the statement.

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On September 30 — Canada's first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation — the queen shared a message from England with Canadians.

"I join with all Canadians on this first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation to reflect on the painful history that Indigenous peoples endured in residential schools in Canada," the message reads. The queen went on to acknowledge "the work that remains to heal and to continue to build an inclusive society."

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