Search on Narcity

Parks Canada Is Offering Free Admission To All National Parks For One Day Only

You can also visit national historic sites and national marine conservation areas for free! 🇨🇦🏞️

Trending Senior Staff Writer
​Parks Canada red chairs in Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta. Right: A cove in Bruce Peninsula National Park in Ontario.

Parks Canada red chairs in Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta. Right: A cove in Bruce Peninsula National Park in Ontario.

Attention adventure seekers! Parks Canada is offering free admission to all of the national parks in Canada but it's for one day only.

The federal government has announced that it is inviting all Canadians and international visitors to connect with nature and history at the country's "most iconic destinations" by taking advantage of free admission to celebrate Canada Day.

On July 1, 2022, all national parks, national historic sites and national marine conservation areas across the country will be open to visitors at no cost.

Also, the locks along Quebec's historic canals and Ontario's Trent-Severn Waterway National Historic Site and the Rideau Canal National Historic Site will be free on Canada Day too.

"From inspiring national historic sites to breathtaking national parks and national marine conservation areas, there is no better way to spend this national holiday than by diving into history or getting outdoors with friends and family," said Steven Guilbeault, minister of environment and climate change who's responsible for Parks Canada.

Admission fees are charged at most national parks and historic sites in Canada, with prices ranging from $4.25 to $6.25 to $8.50 to $10.50.

However, admission is free for youth aged 17 or younger all year long and for new Canadian citizens for one year.

There are 47 national parks, 171 national historic sites, five national marine conservation areas and one national urban park in Canada where you can go hiking, canoeing, stargazing, swimming, biking and more.

Those places include Yoho National Park in B.C., Banff National Park in Alberta, Rouge National Urban Park in Ontario, La Mauricie National Park in Quebec, Cape Breton Highlands National Park in Nova Scotia, Nahanni National Park Reserve in Northwest Territories and Kluane National Park and Reserve in Yukon.

Parks Canada is planning to create new urban national parks in Canada by 2030 in some of Canada's biggest cities and they could be in Saskatoon, Halifax, Winnipeg, Edmonton and Montreal!

Before you get going, check our Responsible Travel Guide so you can be informed, be safe, be smart, and most of all, be respectful on your adventure.

Recommended For You

Loading...