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Toronto Rescues Dogs During Manitoba Fires & They Need Homes

MUTTS Dog Rescue brought home 15 puppies and two adult dogs from their rescue mission to Manitoba, and some are now looking for forever homes.

The Toronto-based not-for-profit rescue group kept five of the dogs and relocated the rest to other Manitoba Animal Alliance (MAA) rescue partners across Ontario.

Kat Morea, co-founder and social media manager of MUTTS Dog Rescue, told Narcity the journey to Manitoba to rescue the pups took over 24 hours by car and all of the dogs rescued were either displaced from the wildfires, homeless or surrendered.

Kat Morea | MUTTS Dog Rescue

"We were contacted by Manitoba Animal Alliance, and we've had a really good relationship with them for quite a while now, and we felt compelled to help Indigenous communities as well through helping dogs."

According to Morea, MAA works closely with remote Indigenous communities by rescuing stray dogs and providing spay and neuter clinics.

Kat Morea | MUTTS Dog Rescue

MUTTS Dog Rescue travelled by car on August 1 to bring over 100 bags of dog food to MAA to help in their on-the-ground efforts to save animals from the harsh conditions brought on by the wildfires. They returned from their journey on August 4.

"We brought over 100 or more bags of food for them that way Manitoba Animal Alliance could disperse the food throughout various communities for dogs that needed it. They're the ones that are actually doing all the groundwork," said Morea.

"We went to Winnipeg and had the dogs brought to us. [...] We were supposed to bring back 10 to 12 dogs, I think, and we ended up with a van full of 17."

Kat Morea | MUTTS Dog Rescue

The five dogs they have kept in their care are currently in foster homes and include three puppies Ace, Scout and Arrow, 8 to 10-week-old siblings, Koda, 8 months old, and Raya, who is 3 to 5 years old.

Kat Morea | MUTTS Dog Rescue

Ace and Scout will be available for foster to adopt on Friday, August 13.

Kat Morea | MUTTS Dog Rescue

Foster to adopt just means the new owners will have to start as fosters with the intention to adopt as the puppies still need their shots and other medical care from the rescue group.

Arrow is still receiving treatment for scabies and will be available for adoption, hopefully in the next coming weeks.

The adoption fee for the puppies will be $850 each, and the adults who will also be up for adoption in the coming weeks, after they have a chance to decompress from their journey, will be $700 each.

Kat Morea | MUTTS Dog Rescue

Morea says they plan to return to Manitoba and rescue more dogs in September, and those who want to help fund their efforts can donate to their GoFundMe page.

Kat Morea | MUTTS Dog Rescue

To adopt the two available pups, you can visit their website tomorrow, or you can apply to foster at any time.

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